Carrot-Ginger-Coconut Soup with Cayenne & Sprouted Buckwheat

Carrot-Ginger-Coconut Soup with Cayenne & Sprouted Buckwheat

Carrot and ginger soup? That’s a timeless classic, always appropriate during the darker, colder months of the year. But with coconut, cayenne and sprouted buckwheat? Here’s to a little twist in this all too famous love story! I really like eating carrots and want to officially thank them for giving me a slight teint – yes, that’s right, they make me look like I just returned from a sunny summer’s holiday. I find some soups more exciting than others, and this carrotty gingery peppery soup is definitely in the exciting category – especially when topped with crunchy buckwheat that isn’t only delicious but also nutritious because otherwise, it wouldn’t appear on this blog as all of you know! 

 

 

buckwheat minus the wheat 

Despite its misleading name, buckwheat is not a wheat. The edible portion comes from a plant that is related to sorrel and rhubarb – isn’t that surprising? Buckwheat is naturally glutenfree and therefore safe to consume for those who suffer from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. These little groats are packed with nutritional goodies such as trace minerals (magnesium, manganese and copper), B vitamins (B6, pantothenic acid, folate, thiamin and niacin) as well as nutritional fiber. The carbohydrates we receive from buckwheat are complex, which means that you stay full for longer and that your blood sugar levels won’t spike, leaving you without energy and craving sugar. By soaking pseudo-grains such as buckwheat, amaranth and quinoa before consuming them, we reduce the anti-nutrient content; anti-nutrients are compounds found in plants that reduce our ability to absorb essential nutrients.

 

why sprout them?

Also, we have the option to sprout our buckwheat, which not only makes the groats better digestible but also nutritionally more valuable. Why? Because the soaking-sprouting process activates dormant enzymes that facilitate the nut or seed to achieve their enzymic peak – the most potent moment for life-bursts. In any case, whether sprouted or not, buckwheat is extremely healthy and easily incorporated in the modern diet. It comes in various shapes and sizes, such as raw or sprouted groats, buckwheat flour and even pasta (referred to as soba noodles). So much variety from one single ingredient, my recipe-loving-mind is going crazy and I cannot wait to share more exciting buckwheat recipes with you. But for now, let’s focus on that soup! 

 

Prep Time: 5 min

Cooking Time: 25 min

Total Time: 30 min

Servings: 2

 

For this recipe you will need:

1 tbsp sesame oil

8 medium carrots

1 onion, minced

2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

2 tbsp freshly grated ginger

1 tsp cumin

1 tsp turmeric

½ tsp cayenne

500ml vegetable stock

200 ml coconut milk

 

For topping:

2 tbsp sprouted buckwheat*

dash of coconut milk

cayenne pepper 

 

To sprout them, simply soak the groats for 30 minutes, then drain and place them in a sprouting jar with two daily rinses. The groats will start sprouting after about three days if kept at room temperature.

 

 

Instructions: 

  1. In a pot, heat the sesame oil and fry the onion, garlic and grated ginger. Add the spices and give a good stir, maybe a little bit of water so that nothing starts burning.
  2. Roughly chop the carrot (the soup will be pureed anyway, so their size shouldn’t be too big but doesn’t have to be even). Allow the carrots to soften a bit, then add the stock and cover with the lid to let it simmer for 20 minutes.
  3. Add the coconut milk and with a stick blender, puree the carrot chunks until all is smooth and creamy. Return to heat and let the soup simmer for another few minutes.
  4. Taste the soup and check whether you’d like to add more salt or pepper. 
  5. Serve in a bowl with a sprinkle of cayenne pepper, a dash of coconut milk and sprouted buckwheat groats. 
  6. Appreciate your meal and the time you spent in order to prepare it – you are serving your mind and body today by giving yourself the space for cooking such a healthy, thoughtful dish – you have all the reason to feel contented and proud of yourself. ♥

 



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